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union and the nato or meant to keep russia out and the germans down now they are triumphant economically. germany may not have the solution to every economic problem but to berlin is the point of arbitration for all of them so the question arises and this goes back to the geography with russia needing the buffer zone in eastern europe remember the collapse didn't indian security facing ray it faced invasions' with will lead vehicle lithuanians, french, german throughout history. so we're back with a regional power flashed with natural gas. a rich and wealthy germany, poland between them that has -- >> it has gas under that many get an energy power in the century. this is living in geography. your argument about russia and russia's in security would be that it's too flat. half the world's longitudes but it's indefensible, it runs north, south so they don't unite the country and had less people than bangladesh. 141 million people, bangladesh has more. so vladimir putin sent up near imperialism on the deepak geographical and security and that's how we should understand not as a madman hour
it better we could come closer to solving the problem it has to do with turkey and russia. explain it to me. >> the bottom line there is old historical triangle between turkey, syria and russia. until we break the triangle we'll not solve the problem. the reason the assad regime has been able to perpetrate genocide against its own people, 50,000 killed, 1 one had you,000 displaced and three million homes destroyed. russia continues to give them arms, $1.5 billion. just last week publicly reported sending cash and currency to the assad regime so they continue to pay their military henchmen to keep doing the genocide. turkey that has been doing good humanitarian work on the border with refugee camps for 150,000. it playing a game of russian rule let, it is all about money. the money is greater than ever coming from russia. they're buying natural gas to the tune of almost $35 billion with russia. putin was just in turkey last week on december 3rd and signed 11 different trade agreements. they hope to increase it to 100 billion over the next few years. there is no sign turkey really means what
the confidence of its most important factor. russia's envoy for medalist affairs says the rebels are gaining control -- envoy for middle east affairs says the rebels are gaining control. washington congratulated the kremlin for waking up to reality. >> the aftermath of a bombing in a damascus suburb. syrian official media said a car packed with explosives blew up near a school in this district to the southwest of the total, and that at least half of the casualties were women and children. "we were going to school when the explosion took place. i do not know anything about my parents. they may have died." this man says the victims were all students, or going to their places of work. after the explosion, the ground was full of bodies. the state news agency has blamed the violence on terrorists, its name for the rebels intensifying attacks on the government. this was the latest in a string of bombings in and around damascus. for the first time, russia has acknowledged the possibility of the rebels winning the civil war in syria. the assad regime was losing control of more and more territory, an
the administration thought it had to take a lot more assertive action. >> what is the pressure of russia, on moscow to dole with this? they've been backing their ally syria. where are they? >> secretary clinton met with the foreign minister of russia a couple of days ago. obviously russia has backed another loser, its propensity in these things. i think they even see this now. probably the best-case scenario is there's some sort of soft landing where assad is offered an exile deal, gets out of the picture. and then you start the retribution massacres and it could turn into something extremely ugly. the hope is russia will get on board and be constructive. the foreign minister said good things but we'll see what russia does. >> what does an intervention looks like? >> if chemical weapons are used, i think it looks a lot like the air strikes in libya. you have to destroy some of those major stockpiles of chemical weapons. if they start to lose control and there are fores that hezbollah might get ahold of them, you might see some special forces on the ground. the idea of chemical weapons, especially f
stakeholders' liked iran and russia. >>thank you for your answers. i'm looking for something a little bit more specific. what is the relation between the new coalition and the military council? do you think they can become an administrative body for the revolution or a government in exile as you just described? >> is there a follow-up question? >> the new coalition actually put three things they have to do. the first to form a new government and to form a military council, and in the third thing the to play a role in the humanitarian assistance or humanitarian aid. the debate right now within the new coalition, are we able to form a government until we get it in guarantees from the international community, suc. restated three examples before of government in exile. if there is no recognition of the international community, there is nothing the government in exile can do. the second thing is the financial assistance. i said before, after the formation of the serbian national council, six months we don't have what we need to do. you cannot work as a workin exile with individual budgets. the rela
report in minutes. heather: and new controversy over a move by russia's president that critics say is playing politics with the lives of orphans. what it could mean for americans who want to adopt overseas. our legal panel debates. i greg: welcome back. jenna: a fox extreme weather alert. this is no system bringing heavy wind and rain and snow to the northeast for dumping as much as 1.5 feet of snow on new york and pennsylvania. after devastating parts of the golf coast with tornadoes speak to the system is moving slowly north. but don't put away the snow shovels yet. there is another storm on the way. jenna: maria molina joins us with the very latest. reporter: you guys are right. we have another snow system that will dump a lot more snow over the northeast, and it actually produced tornadoes on christmas day. you sure you guys that this was historical. there are lots of city scenes of 14 inches of snow. across parts of upstate new york, we have reports of snow coming down out there still. our current storm or an excellent system is starting to take shape, producing areas of light
russia as russia's president signs an adoption ban. stop! stop! stop! come back here! humans -- we are beautifully imperfect creatures living in an imperfect world. that's why liberty mutual insurance has your back with great ideas like our optional better car replacement. if your car is totaled, we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. call... and ask one of our insurance experts about it today. hello?! we believe our customers do their best out there in the world, and we do everything we can to be there for them when they need us. [car alarm blaring] call now and also ask about our 24/7 support and service. call... and lock in your rate for 12 months today. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? >>> nasty, nasty, nasty winter storm has eased, but it left a lot of the u.s. covered with snow. maine was the last to feel the brunt of the snowstorm, which hammered the midwest and south just this week. some areas of maine saw up to ten inches of snow overnight, forcing state offices to close. the bad weather not over yet. northeast bracing for more sn
rights violators in russia. it was sparked by the death of a russian lawyer who died died in jail investigating a fraud case at the request of americans in russia. it singles out dozens of russians that police believe are connected to that case. they can't travel to the united states and their assets are frozen. russia has been defiant in this case. it is even launching a posthumous price for the new law and russian voices speaking of saying it's not fair to penalize children. having adopted 60,000 over last two decades, and as you mentioned, there are several dozen cases right now that are pending. several dozen russian children who are in the final stages of this adoption process. those who should be coming to the united states very soon. it is not clear what's going to happen to them. it's very sad because the parents and children have had numerous visits to russia by the parents. the russians have put them through the loops to see the u.s. governm says it will fight to see that these cases come together. but the law is not clear at this point what is going to happen. heather:
the syria crisis at another country. >> yes. the secretary directed her comments to russia. she emphasized that the stain legs of these patriot systems in turkey is not meant to destabilize nato's already uneasy relationship with moscow. back here at state chided the russians for skipping upcoming crisis meeting on the syrian conflict. >> we want to see obviously, you know, russia come around to the point of view of the international community with regard to what's happening in syria. you know, we want to work with russia as we have said many times from this podium on the basis of the geneva action group's communication. >> clinton is expected to meet with her russian counterpart sometime in the next 48 hours, shep. >> shepard: meantime syrian rebels are taking their fight to the capital of damascus. move aimed at putting additional pressure of regime and hitting the heart of president assad's power. that strategy is coming at a bloody cost. witnesses say a mortar slammed into a ninth grade classroom in a damascus suburb. state media early reported 30 dead. killed 13 children and a teacher
of other countries towards syria. syria's closest ally other than iran is russia. today russia moved five warships to the mediterranean to prepare to evacuate russian citizens out of that country. there are a lot of russians who live in syria. and a massive evacuation is something russia had resisted doing all of this time because, we think, they thought it would make their ally look bad. well, now things have progressed in this war to the point where they appear to be no longer concerned than. they are preparing to get their people out. for those of us who are friends of richard and ghazi and john, and of course for their families, today and last night when we learned are just pure joy and relief that they are okay. but for all of us who beyond friendship just admire these guys, right, just admire their work, admire that they're willing to take such risks to report from war zones, the next thing today after the relief and the joy that they have been released unharmed, the next thing today is to remember that the thing they take that risk for is to get the story out to the world of what i
. russia. the blast ripped through an apartment building in the central city. officials say it happened during construction work. a gas container reportedly exploded on upper level of a 10 story building. dozens of people living nearby had to evacuate. cochings seized record cash of drugs in a mountain village. they found 15 tons of cocaine worth $450 million in an underground chamber beneath the home. traffickers had reportedly felony in the drugs from venezuela. hun hun door honduras a major shipping corridor. caught a rare chinese sturgeon. the indangerred species is said it be so old it lived among the dinosaurs. kept it in a tank where alerting police. officials released it into the sea some 15 miles offshore. belgium a new electronic christmas tree. replacing the famous fir tree. the 70-foot tall creation has led's and video production screen. for a few bucks you can climb its staircase for a full view of the famous plaza. proceeds go to a charity for the homeless and that's a wrap on this fox trip around the world in 80 seconds. >> share the holidays with the share everything pla
that we have right now to help get him out and to get him away from this is russia. russia stood up and told him to stop the chemical weapon issue, and he backed off. now that he's at it again, i think russia needs to stand up and hopefully they will. it's also good to hear that some of the arab countries are trying to find a way to get him out. you know, we don't know whether or not he's lost his mind, that he's scared, that we just don't know what's going to happen, but this could be a leverage for him to find a way to get out and to find a way to take his family somewhere in the world. >> greta: there's always the problem even if he goes, if he gets aasylu siel some place, whs going to take over and secure the chemical weapons. that's always been israel's fear. if assad fallless, who takes over? >> that's what we do, find the chem and biological weapons. syria was a more sophisticated country than libya, but we know what happened in libya. i've had conversations with numerous americans from syria, a lot of people, doctors and people who have connections in their families that are
for russia to come around and pave the way to a u.n. resolution similar to that in the case of libya, do you think that that waiting will pay off? >> i don't think so. it's hard to imagine russia at this point, anyway, from my vantage point. maybe i have been proved wrong. approving of a u.n. resolution. even in the latest talks that secretary of state hillary clinton has had with the russian foreign minister, it's not like everybody is on the same page. they're not. obviously, the russians are looking at this very closely because they can see their client busard is in a very tricky situation and do they want to be on the losing side? on the same token, with the u.s. not really being involved has not really many friends on the ground in syria. what happens if bashar falls? who do you talk to and have relations with on the ground? i know they have come up with this coalition, this opposition coalition, but that, too, has yet to fully prove itself as an effective and consolidated opposition to bashar alsad. a coalition that can have his core group of defectors to break and to basically come ov
relationship with russia. i think it was a vote on my behalf and others to say we would like a better relationship with the russian people and the russian government. this is an opportunity for russia to show that that vote was juft, this is an opportunity to show the international community at large you can be a constructive force at a time of great need and you have the capability to do some good. i find it ironic and red lines are talked about, but the red line here is literally red. the line we're crossing is 40,000 people have died. what bothers me is the most we are all fixated on the method of killing, not the killing itself. for over a year, we have been talking about getting involved and need to stop this before it gets out of hand. we want to shape what happens after assad leaves. it will be hard to go to the syrian people when they achieve their freedom and say we would like to help you and they will say, you did little at a time in our debatest need. we have a chance to correct that impression. from an american national security point of view, if we don't secure these chem
here? >> reporter: yes, gregg. russia is furious about a u.s. law which puts visa bans and asset freezes on 60 russians that congress believes were involved in some way or complicit in the deaths of a russian lawyer in jail in 2009. now he was investigating a massive fraud case at the request of a u.s. company in russia that believed millions of dollars it paid to the russian government in tax money were diverted, stolen by russians with connections to the government. he was 30 self -- 37 years old when he died and the allegations are that at best he was denied medical treatment while in jail. at worse he was tortured. russia has been very defiant in this case and trying him posthumously for fraud. the russian government passed this ban, what appears to be retaliatory law prohibiting americans from adopting russian orphans, naming the law after a 2-year-old boy who died while in the custody of u.s. adopted parents a few years ago. gregg? gregg: amy, are there repercussions here? >> reporter: there certainly are. even though this law was passed pretty much unanimously in russia's
, with russia and china, containment when it came to russia was countering their expansive capabilities. >> rose: right. >> our own -- when it came to their nuclear capability we were talking about deterrence. >> rose: right. >> and so i think first we want to contain iranian influence in the region, but i think the question that people are -- that what the president is really addressing is, or would we be content with deterrence? >> right. >> and there i think the difference in the ayatollahs and their religious, their they cratic approach to the world, their threats to destroy israel make them a more worrisome, significantly more worrisome possess sorry of nuclear weapons than other nuclear states. >> rose: because they have a different decision al type structure. >> yes. >> rose: from russia, and the soviet union from going into europe once again, deterrence is mutually assured destruction. and so then, does the question of value and life, different because of a culture that can produce suicide bombers mean that there -- means that will not work in the end or do you say no nationable and the
. >> designed by russia to protect its city's military bases and icbm by attack by the united states. the sa 17 is among the most sophisticated air defense systems in the world. russia sold the system to syria. now with syria falling into the chaos of civil war and desperate need for men, ammunition and equipment. for more than a year now, fox news has exposed the clandestine resupply of syria's military by iran using commercial airliners and unregistered cargo planes seen here offloading syria's military airports. now western intelligence sources confirm the planes are flying back to iran loaded with the sa 17's. current plans by israel and the townhouse attack iran's nuclear facilities count on using electronic counter measures to defeat iran's relatively outdated air defense system. if deployed around iran's facility the sa 17 would vastly increase their protection. now in addition to the missiles iran gets from syria, they have been highly successful at reverse engineering this kind of technology. so with just a few sa 17 systems that could build many many more, shep. it's clear this intell
of albania and russia are quite different. it was more the -- in many cases actually it was the degree to which civil society and those society had been maintained or reconstructed that made the big difference between how well they recovered. >> civil society can be quite nasty itself. a lot of the most, the nastiest islamist groups in the middle east tend to be very rich, civil society organizations that provide social welfare and they happen to believe in very extreme form of islam and there are parallels in europe as well. >> the interesting thing about islam, the islamist movements in that part of the world are at an important turning point. until now, they've had a lot of credit, if you will, and a lot of the populations put a lot of faith in them because they were the only alternative to the government. i mean, either because they were somehow tolerated or because they were able to be more powerful because they had access to mosques and better ways of organizing people. they were often the only civil society organizations that were allowed to be functioning. now that the regimes
but the conference in dubai raises a specter of nations including iran, china, russia and others agreeing to live under the u.n. rules, what critics call restrictions. while the u.n. --. pardon me. while the u.n. maintains this is not about controlling the u.n. the critics say it is part of a red drip, drip regulation that will chip away internet freedom. >> even if internet freedom escapes this conference in dubai, this is just a stepping steen from countries like china, russia and other arab states they have been patient for the last 10 years and several years going forward they will continue to be persistent. >> reporter: the u.s. has a sizable delegation in dubai, about 1650 people. in simple terms they want internet regulation off the table and want the u.n. body to stick to networks already regulated so the telecommunications networks, phone networks but just leave the internet neutral if that is at all possible, jenna. jenna: we'll see what comes out of this conference. catherine, thank you. >> reporter: you're welcome. jon: imagine having a direct line of communication with the pope? it i
through. a blizzard. we are seeing very cold conditions across many parts of russia down through to the ukraine and poland as well. snow and ice is already on the ground and causing quite a few problems with the driving as well. for many of us in the eastern parts of europe, it will stay very cold but the system over the southeastern parts will be spinning around and also giving heavy showers across parts of libya down through egypt as well. for the western parts of northern africa, mostly fine and subtle. not a great deal of problems with the weather. to the east, some of the showers could turn out rather strong. but whether it can also be making its way further to the east, too. already plenty of heavy downpours -- and more heading through thursday. all of it pushing steadily toward the east. kuwait will likely to see clouds and just a chance of thunderstorms. of the people in these camps have fled violence or poverty elsewhere in the country. the government has no where to put them. and elsewhere across afghanistan, aid groups are trying to distribute emergency supplies to the
about the impact. >> arthel: we have new details of the deadly plane crash out of russia. police say that four crew members are dead and four others have been injured after an airliner slammed into the international airport overshooting the runway and crashed into a nearby highway. officials say the plane which can carry up to 210 passengers was empty as it was on its way from the czech republic. they are looking into whether a powerful snowstorm may be to the blame. >> thousands of firefighters across the u.s. and canada are traveling to western new york to attend the memorial services for two fallen heroes. they were shot and killed on crime eve. the shooter killed himself at scene and had served 17 years in prison for killing his mother. a woman allegedly helped purchase the weapon. the community is coming together that all the visiting firefighters have a place to stay. many of them will be staying at hampton inn there for free. >> gregg: new developments in the investigation of a subway shoving death in new york city. police saying a woman is in custody after she made statements
. secretary of state hillary clinton said today that the united states and russia to get syrian president al-assad to talk about the political transition and syria. she spoke yesterday with russia's for a minister and the u.n. peace envoy to the next conversation with u.s. ambassador to syria, robert ford on president assad using chemical weapons. investor four was part of an event held by the foundation for defense of democracy is yesterday. this is about half an hour. >> the good morning. very nice to be here. let me thank andy for that very kind introduction and i would also like to thank john for inviting me here to talk to the foundation for the defense of democracy st. john and i go way back to when we were in iraq together. another tough situation where we were trying to help promote space change in the middle east. i am only going to talk for about ten minutes and then i would welcome some questions and a little more of a discussion. so just listening to me drone on. i want to take just one minute and give you my sense of the situation on the ground and syria, which is changing. and
or russia. u.n. secretary general was asked about the asylum question today he did not seem to favor the idea. listen. >> the united nations must not allow any impunity whoever commits gross violation of human rights must be held accountable and should be brought to justice. >> that sentiment was echoed by officials at the u.s. state department who said there has to be, quote: accountability. the counter argument to that is that perhaps anything that gets assad out of syria and stops the slaughter of civilians might be worth thinking about, harris. >> some people may be wondering what happens if in fact assad does go. we still haven't seen united opposition of all those rebels to replace him. >> we certainly have not seen anything like a united opposition. the rebels say that he they are seeking more of a unified political leadership but it is hard to come by because there are so many groups involved in pposition movement from secular democrats who began this simply as a way to gain more democracy in syria to hard line islamist and even al qaeda groups. one of those hard line groups
into the air. and it's our top story as we go around the world in 80 seconds. russia. scientists say molten rock and ash are spewing from a 3-mile long crack in the volcano's slopes. hundreds of tourists flocked to russia when it stopped erupting last month for the decades. lava was reportedly destroyed a campsite and research station but nobody hurt. india. two roadside bombs exploded in the northeast. officials say it happened near a water tank just after a security convoy had driven through the area. the blast hurt one truck driver's leg. at last word nobody claimed responsibility for the explosion. an artic can a. a team of 25 scientists from china on a mission towards the south pole. it's the 12 expedition to the island's ice cap. >> you ukraine. three african white lion cubs were born in the zoo in the south. zoo keepers say it's rare for the species to give birth in captivity. caretakers have brought the cubs inside to protect them from the harsh winter temperatures and that's a wrap on this fox trip around the world in 80 seconds. supreme court nominee robert bork has died. closer l
arab ya and the united states and russia and the european countries. what happened in lebanon -- if left to themselves, lebanon -- which is another sad story -- they might have been able to compromise and come together as they did on a number of occasion before re '7s and '80s, and work things out somehow. find some sort of system and muddle through this. but as they say in real estate, location is everything. and lebanon being between syria and israel, and of course syria itself being on the border of israel, lebanon, iraq, south of turkey, you're not going to be -- you cannot be the switzerland over the middle east. are going to have outside influences which usually exacerbate the situation and lengthen the time of the civil war. >> and so let's talk a little bit now, shifting the perspective, to the personal connections that you have to the house of assad. i would love for you to give us a good feel for, who is this man who is the president and how did he change over the time that you've known him? seems like there was a definitive time around 2005-2006 that you say he shif
. this marks 20 years since russia and the u.s. agreed to secure weapons in the former soviet state. leon panetta introduces the president at this event. >> thank you. [applause] midafternoon. senators, distinguished guests, ambassadors and officials, thank you all for being here today. i am honored to be able to participate in this symposium marking the 20th anniversary. let me thank the university for their great work in organizing today's conference. it has been a day to reflect on the successes that have been achieved in non-proliferation over the past two decades through the program, and it has been a particular honor to be when the company of senators whose leadership has made this possible. we can stay the course of history change for the better because these men helped the nation confronts the threat of nuclear proliferation at the end of the cold war. the world would have been a far more dangerous and threatening place were it not for these patriots. earlier this afternoon i was honored to be able to present the distinguished public service award, the highest civilian honor. he h
, french, german, russia, china, so once all tend to view it as a proliferation problem. it tends to be about that issue very narrowly focused. so to kind of move the conversation, you have to figure a different architecture to address that. but the five plus one processors such as designed to do with the proliferation issue in the conversation is that it has to do with arantxa violations of the npt that a security council resolution suggests iran activity so forth and so on. there's two countries however that suggests the issue that this is not a proliferation issue that has to do with the character for the regime but those are for israel. the second one is iran who similarly suggested that this is nice control issue from the perspective of the west, but there really is an arms control is a multilateral icing regime. there were two that is in this particular who are not accepting the argument. the argument about nuclear infractions. so having said that, if you look at it historically, the united states has managed to negotiate successfully arms control treaties with countries of
an approximation. >> this week the secretary of state hillary clinton, she met with russia's foreign minister and the u.n. special envoy to syria. as you know, russia has blocked action against al assad at the u.n., but some have speculate that had moscow may be considering a different aprove. i mean, is russia stopping the u.s., do you think, from going into syria? >> i think the russians are beginning to realize that this problem simply cannot be ignored, and their passive stance on it simply doesn't provide for any constructive solution, so i hope that they will work with us on this, and i think the more international consensus we have on what is to be done, the less likely is the danger that the removal of the regime will result in the fragmentation of syria all together and regional conflicts erupting. that is the real danger, and that's what people should be concentrating on. >> you know, some have made the comparison that getting involved with syria or in syria is similar to us getting involved in libya and taking action against libya. do you see it that way? >> not quite. i supported
. >> instagram is backing off a new policy that allowed it to use photos. >> out of russia, a truck rolling over spilling out dozens of cows. >> do fans ever ask you to curse at them? >> all the time. >> and all that matters. >> you've got to be kidding me. you know, in this town with that kind of e-mail, do you think he could have survived the cia? i don't think so. >> on "cbs this morning." >> a box office record, "the hobbit: an unexpected journey ea. >> it's about tom cruise's ea. >> it's about tom cruise's search for a new wife. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." a new report on the attack that destroyed the american consulate in benghazi, libya, pulls no punches. it says the state department failed to provide proper security for the u.s. ambassador to libya and other officials who were killed. >> however, the report does not blame any one person for the failures and it recommends no one be fired or disciplined. margaret brennan is in washington. margaret, good morning. >> good morning to you, norah and to charlie. the review of the fatal assault blames systemic fai
the new chain. burger king has similar joint ventures in russia, brazil, south africa and china. >> more than 14,000 dock workers on the east coast and the gulf are threatening to go on strike on sunday. brian takes a look at the impact it could have on the economy. >> they move everything from our clothes to toys and electronics through the ports and into the marketplace but a lot of the goods won't be making it to our stores in longshoreman at more than a dozen ports from main to texas go on strike. that's what could happen by sunday if a deal can't be reached between the major shipping companies and a union representing nearly 15,000 longshoremen. >> the impact would be great. obviously on the dollar value side. on the cargo handling side but also on the job side because again these sports are major economic generators. >> richard of the maryland port administrator and others say the economic damage from a strike would reach well beyond the docks. >> your mom and pop retailer to your farmer to the trucking company that has to pick up the container atmosphere the port. so not just at t
to be very significant. >> yeah it, certainly is. because russia remember has been president bashar assad's greatest ally and protecter. if they are changing their tone now, accepting that the rebels are getting closer and closer to assad's power center in damascus through the violence that we have seen intensifying over the last couple of weeks, it signifies that the russians are realizing that their greatest friend in the middle east is about to be out of power and they better pretty quickly start making some new friends among the rebel opposition. officials say they are simply pleased to see the russians finally facing up to reality, listen. >> we agree that assad will not be a part of syrians future. we have noted as the media has the progress that the opposition has been making. we still believe that for the sake of the syrian people assad ought to leave now. >> now the questions remain of course how long does president assad -- can president assad hold on? how desperate does he get while he does that and in that desperation, what kind of extreme measures might he take? what kind of
. >>> russia banning american families from adopting russian children. apparently retaliation because the u.s. a drawing attention to human rights violations in the country. the ban takes effect new year's day. the u.n. you u.n. children's fund estimates there are about 740,000 orphans in it russia and over the last two decades american families have adopted 620,000 of them. i'm marianne rafferty. now -- 60,000 of them. i'm marianne rafferty. now, back to "on the record." >> greta: this is a fox news weather alert for the second time this week a large part of the country is bracing for an extreme winter storm. now, who is going to get slammed and when. in accuweather meteorologist jim dickey is tracking that storm. jim, who is going to get it first? >> seeing the snow right now already across southern illinois and southern, indiana. with the storm, not packing the punch that its predecessor did but still a wide swath of snow across the ohio valley spreading its way north and eastward and then the cold front with the system putting down substantial rainfall. good news is nothing in the way o
implications. the rurian government is contemplating to pull out of damascus. if russia does that, it basically communicates that russia no longer has confidence in the assad regime. >> right. >> same thing with the united states. we opened diplomatic negotiations and when you are confronted with that decision, does the situation become so dangerous that you withdraw? you're sending a signal you no longer have confidence that a government can properly protect its people and this is the recalculation that's going to have to be done. you know? we are going to find our diplomats in these kind of challenging situations but what will happen in these high threat areas is we'll recognize and we can no longer rely first and foremost on the host nation government but to bring more marines, more diplomatic security in to the situations so that we provide a basic level of protection for our diplomats in these troubling post-conflict zones. >> p.j. quickly switching gears, chuck hagel is widely rumored to be the next pick of secretary of defense, coming under attack of fellow republicans on his record on f
be a sign that russia might now be ready to shift its position and support stronger u.n. action against syria. molly henneberg is live at the pentagon keeping an eye on all of these developments. why is russia so important here, molly. >> reporter: russia is one of syria's allies, in fact one of sear kwras onl syria as only allies. and that is why it is thought they may have some sway over syria and bashar al-assad. hillary clinton is in a meeting this afternoon at a security conference in dublin, ireland. they will be meeting today specifically on syria. at the same time the secretary general of the united nations says he also is pressing syria not to use chemical weapons. >> i'm just very much concerned, and i have warned that in any case if chemical weapons is used then they will have to be put to justice and create serious consequences to those people. >> reporter: if president bashar al-assad were to leave the country it would create an immediate problem with who would take over and a secondary problem of who would control the chemical weapons. jon. jon: it is one thing to load ser
. >> syria is suspected of possessing the world's third largest after the u.s. and russia. seron gas can be put in arstilliery shells whampt if is the risk for the u.s. should those weapons be used. >> again, when we start making these large blanket statementings of weapons. in secret our intelligence agency knows what bunkers they are in and how many they are and know and the syrians know we know . we do face an issue down stream at some point which is not that the syrians use the weapon. how do we get them before the terrorist get them. that one is going to be tough to figure out . because the only logical thing is to send teams on the ground to secure them and that's a, you really have to think carefully how you do that. >> really quickly sir, to your point of other terrorist geth their hands on the weapons. if assad flees for example. that is the big worry. militant groups that are on the ground there and rebels gleting their hands on the weapons . the impact of that. can you speak to that for a moment. >> that's the big worry and i think that is why the administration really too slo
missiles could mean for the larger conflict. alisyn: that is good context. what is russia saying now about the assad regime? >> reporter: yesterday they came out and said, all right, we think there is a possibility president assad would fall. this is one of those things speaking to truth as this russian diplomat did may not exactly jive with the party line. inside baseball here as russia came out today and forcefully gotten behind president assad said, no, no, our diplomat was misquoted. he was saying what the opposition was saying. a little fanciful. there was hope as the humanitarian crisis increases inside syria there are many more hundreds if not thousands of people dying inside syria that russia may be loosening ties to president assad. sadly for the united states and allies we found out that russia is continuing to hold fast with president assad their long time ally and happy to see him kill as many of his own citizens as he would like. alisyn: thanks leland. bill: you think about the last two years of headlines and think about this region how much it dominated the coverage we've had
and months. lou: moving quickly to syria as we wrap up. russia today -- from the deputy foreign minister, basically saying that they have acknowledged that bashar al-assad has been losing power and that his departure is a foregone conclusion. suddenly they are talking about strong support for bashar al-assad and making it very clear that they firmly support his regime. >> the russians cannot let go. he is an allied to iran and some are anti-american. what i see now is that the civil war in syria is going to grow, unfortunntely. an opposition that cannot bring him down very fast. lou: as always, thank you for being with us. thank you. lou: much more on the obama administration's foreign-policy in the middle middle east. the "a-team" towards us coming up. federal workers are thriving in the obama economy with record paid benefits. far outpacing government workers. it seems that government workers still unhappy. unions upset with the new reality of coworker reform. alan wilson joins us and tells us why they should be cheering you right to work laws. [ male announcer ] where do you turn for
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